The 50-some poems in Dianne Hicks Morrow's first book of poetry, Long Reach Home, extend back into memory and forward into wish, and find homes for each in the language of poetry.

Reaching back through a family full of stories and characters, from Newfoundland on her mother's side to New Brunswick on her father's, the poems in Long Reach Home are characteristically personal, warm, and accessible — by turns humorous, by turns enraged -—but always engaged with the world, distilling simple pleasures and fundamental human struggles from everyday experience.

The lasting effects of a brush with polio are vividly portrayed in her award-winning sequence "Polio Kick." Childhood with a mother who won't give up swimming, even though she's blind; adulthood a balancing act between family and the world outside.... Morrow's poems are characteristically personal, warm, and accessible — by turns humorous, by turns enraged — but always engaged with the world, distilling simple pleasures and fundamental human struggles from everyday experience.

Like the strong beams of an old-fashioned house renovated to accommodate the bustle and love and frustration of a modern woman, the poems portray the family and familiars that make her house a home.

"A book of wisdom, grace and gratitude. The lyricism and truth of her words reach out and take us all home."

— Sheree Fitch, In This House Are Many Women